Christian/Catholic · Homily/Sermon Notes · Ordinary Time

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost ~ Homily Notes

the-parable-of-the-pharisee-and-the-tax-collector

 

Gospel: Luke 18:9-14

And to some who trusted in themselves as just, and despised others, he spoke also this parable: Two men went up into the temple to pray: the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee standing, prayed thus with himself: O God, I give thee thanks that I am not as the rest of men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, as also is this publican. I fast twice in a week: I give tithes of all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off, would not so much as lift up his eyes towards heaven; but struck his breast, saying: O God, be merciful to me a sinner. I say to you, this man went down into his house justified rather than the other: because every one that exalteth himself, shall be humbled: and he that humbleth himself, shall be exalted.

 

Notes taken from Fr. John Shannon’s homily on August 13, 2017

Humility is the virtue in which, realizing our own nothingness, we attribute all our good works to God. Everything we have has come from God.

Publicans often were guilty of extortion and adultery. The Publican was indeed a sinner, but we see him being truly sorry for his sins. Ironically, the Pharisee is guilty of the same sins he sees in the Publican. When someone becomes puffed up with pride, he or she falls into the same type of sin which he or she judges. The Publicans hid their extortion with religious hypocrisy… the latter sin of which the Pharisee is guilty. The Pharisee is also guilty of a kind of spiritual adultery.

It is important to remember that the only comparison that matters is that to Christ, the model of virtue. It is sometimes tempting to look down upon others, especially those who do not belong to the Catholic Church (or those who we deem to be more sinful than ourselves), but we must not fall into this trap.

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