ADHD · Educate Yourself · Education · mental illness · psychology

The ADHD Problem

I’ve known for a while that there was something off about how so many children are being diagnosed with ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder). I’ve been in several situations where a parent warned me that his or her child had ADHD… only to find that this child seems to be perfectly normal. “But that’s because you see that child when he is on his medication,” you might argue. That’s what I used to think as well, but certain experiences have made me start to think differently. I recently delved into the ADHD issue after reading some interesting articles on the subject.

The first one that really got me interested in this issue is called “The Drugging of the American Boy” by Ryan D’Agostino, editor-in-chief of The article begins:

By the time they reach high school, nearly 20 percent of all American boys will be diagnosed with ADHD. Millions of those boys will be prescribed a powerful stimulant to “normalize” them. A great many of those boys will suffer serious side effects from those drugs. The shocking truth is that many of those diagnoses are wrong, and that most of those boys are being drugged for no good reason—simply for being boys. It’s time we recognize this as a crisis.

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a reader's life · book posts · Educate Yourself · reading tips

How to Read More Books


Well, hello. It is I, Anna, the person who rarely posts on her blog.

I thought it was about time I post again. When trying to think of something to blog about to get back into the flow, I thought – why not something about reading that I’ve seen in a blog/vlog before?

So without further ado, I introduce to you my list of how to read more books.

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1 star · Book Reviews · today's society · We Read Trashy Millennial "Literature" So That You Don't Have To

The Princess Saves Herself in this One {Book Review}


Anna’s rating: 1 out of 5. Or 1000. Whatever the percentage as little as possible. Is there a 0 out of 5 option on Goodreads? We should make one.

Episode 1 of Anna Reviewing Trash That Shouldn’t Be Called Poetry

My friend has this thing where she reads John Green books even though she knows they’re terrible – just so that she can talk about how terrible they are. I decided to offer my services to the We Read Trashy Millennial “Literature” So That You Don’t Have To club.

One of my favourite reviews:

poetry.” [x]

I would add that neither does the addition of only one sentence to a page.

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4 stars · 5 stars · alternative music · country music · music · Music Reviews · Troye Sivan

My Favourite Music of 2017

This time I’ll actually list something that was released in 2017, since there were a couple albums that I quite enjoyed.

My favourites albums released last year, from least to most favourite (I provide links to the songs I just really really love).



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5 stars · a reader's life · Book Reviews · Books · Christian/Catholic · Classics · fiction · nonfiction · oscar wilde · Reviews · YA books

My Favourite Reads of 2017


Before anyone thinks that this is a list of books from 2017 that I liked – stop right there. I don’t read many new books. Ergo, the title is “My Favourite Reads of 2017” not “My Favourite Books of 2017.” See?? Alright, we can continue.


I definitely didn’t read as many books as I am usually prone to doing, but that means I can just move on up from here and read more next year!

Without further ado, here is my top ten list (the ordering could probably be shifted around a bit as always).

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3 stars · 4 stars · Book Reviews · Books · Sherlock Holmes · YA books

A Study in Charlotte {Book Review}



A Study in Charlotte is going to be one of the last books I manage to get in before the end of the year, and since I had enough things that I both loved and hated about it, I thought it was a good time to write a review. And post quotes I liked. Lots of them.

Description (taken from this review): A Study in Charlotte follows the descendants of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson as they solve crimes on a modern-day college campus. In this story, both Sherlock and Watson were real people and Arthur Conan Doyle was Watson’s literary agent, who helped publish the tales of their cases. Many years later, Charlotte Holmes and Jamie Watson find themselves caught up in some copycat crimes that appear to be framing the two, using scenes directly out of the old stories.

I wanted the two of us to be complicated together, to be difficult and engrossing and blindingly brilliant.

And now on to my thoughts. Obviously, spoilers galore.

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a reader's life · Books · Challenges · read-a-thons

2018 Reading Challenge

December’s only just started, and everyone is already getting excited about their TBR piles for next year, it seems. I usually wouldn’t post about this so soon (I mean, I haven’t even finished my pitiful Goodreads challenge of 40 books yet. I have no idea what happened – actually, I do, it’s school), but I wanted to save the challenges I like before I lose them, so I thought that I would just go ahead and post.

I came across this amazing list from one of the reading groups on facebook I’m on, and it sure gave me many ideas from which to choose. First of all, I’m going to try to read 60 books. I read quite a much wider variety of books this year – from teaching books like The Elements of Teaching to political books like Ann Coulter’s Adios, America to some Victorian YA (Libba Bray) with even a little poetry (John Keats) mixed in.

Along with the Goodreads challenge, I want to try and do the Books ‘N Tunes challenge because when I read a book I really enjoy, I usually associate certain songs with it. Why not try to do it with all, or most, of the books I read this upcoming year? I’m also going to keep the A-to-Z Challenge (because it would be interesting to try to cover each letter of the alphabet) as well as the POPSUGAR Challenge (I’ve already printed it out) in mind for some reading inspiration, but I won’t be too sad if I can’t complete them because I’d rather focus on reading the books on my shelf that I’ve wanted to read for a long time.

Another sort-of-related-to-reading goal:

  • I’d like to try to improve my phone photographs and make my instagram a bookstagram. I took a couple pictures I’m pretty proud of (namely this and this and this and this and this), but those were far and few between.
Educate Yourself · The Bad & Ugly · today's society

Polygamy – Bad for Both Men and Women

A friend of mine messaged me this morning wondering if I had any thoughts on the polygamy debate (from arguments of reason rather than those of religion). Not only was I glad to help, but I got interested enough to do some digging of my own.

Polygamy usually manifests itself in polygyny (one male with several females) rather than polyandry. While this might sound great for the guys, it only works out well for some men. While high-status men can gain several wives, men with lower status won’t be able to have any. Since the sex ratio in humans is close to 1:1, polygamy means that many men will be left without wives at all. Wives are like wealth – one may dream of a utopian society where everyone may take as much as they like, but the truth of the matter is that there’s only so much to go around. It sounds much better for everyone to be equal instead of the top 1% keeping the most to themselves, is it not? (Looking at you, Big Business.) Uncomfortable with that analogy to wealth? That’s the whole point – in polygamy, wives (or husbands) are made into mere possessions, rather than a partner to work with and to love. Polygamy objectifies people, rather than respecting their dignity.

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Christian/Catholic · Milo Yiannopoulos · the modernist church · today's society

RE: The Catholic Magazine Interview with Milo They Refused to Print

It’s no great secret that I’m a fan of Milo Yiannopolous. His charisma and his refusal to be afraid to mock political correctness delighted me, giving hope to a young woman who is still trying to learn not to be afraid to show the world who she is. I learned about him when I was going through a difficult time, still trying to figure myself out. (But that’s a story for another day.)

Unfortunately, I was recently very disappointed to see Milo, who had before proclaimed that he was against same-sex marriage, even though he was pursuing a homosexual lifestyle, change his mind recently. I still pray for him, of course. A Catholic priest remarked that Milo doesn’t have the usual obstructions to leaving his lifestyle that most homosexuals do, simply because he realizes the sin of his lifestyle. Therefore, I still have hope for him.

… which leads into our topic of the day. Milo just came out with a particularly zingy article and I just couldn’t help myself but post a short commentary on it.

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Christian/Catholic · Homily/Sermon Notes · Ordinary Time

Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost ~ homily notes


Feel free to listen to this heavenly version of “Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes” as you read through today’s homily notes. That’s what I’m doing. (Thanks for the song rec, Mariela!)


There are two lessons that can be taken from today’s Gospel reading. The first is this – we see that Christ doesn’t heal the lepers right away, but upon their request, gives them a command. The lepers show humility, and only upon their obedience are they healed. God wishes for our obedience and humility, even if we do not understand.

The other lesson is the important of gratitude. The person who keeps asking for favours, but never shows thanks, soon wears out his welcome. This is also true with God. When the one leper returned, we see that Jesus appreciated the gratitude of the Samaritan, and felt the ingratitude of the others keenly. Some commentators think that the leper left the schism of Samaritanism and became a Jew. Once the apostles started to preach the Gospel, he became a Christian and began to help spreading the Faith due to his gratitude of the favour Jesus had shown him. The other lepers were received back into society, but did not receive the spiritual graces the other did.

In a way, when we spread the knowledge of the Kingdom, God becomes indebted to us. He promises great happiness in Heaven for the little we do here on earth.